Posts Tagged ‘police’

Received a Ticket

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

Continuing on from my last post a ticket for exceeding the speed limit by 15-20km/hr arrived by mail after the pay by date had elapsed. I am furious but from past experience there is little you can do because the law considers me to be guilty from the outset. To be in a position to take the matter to court you need money, time and patience none of which I can provide at the moment.

I dont agree with being booked by a police officer who doesn’t know how to correctly operate the radar equipment so the ticket has been ignored and put aside – I refuse to pay the fine. I will do community service or donate to a charity but I refuse to top up the government purse and encourage further use of radar to rip people off.

The use of radar to detect speeding motorists is fine when the operators are trained to use the equipment according to the manufacturers and industry guidlines. Victorian Police officers have proven to me that they don’t know the operational requirements fully and they have no training on how to avoid taking incorrect readings.

No Speeding Ticket Written

Wednesday, May 27th, 2009

I got pulled up for speeding by a mobile radar unit last night but the police officer didn’t write a ticket so I have to wait and see if I receive a summons to appear in court. There was a bend in the road between the mobile radar vehicle and my car when the reading was taken, as a consequence this increases the detected speed. The police officer claimed I was travelling at 119km/hr according to the radar device.

When I was pulled up my first comment was to point out the bend in the road and then to ask the officer if he could explain how the Doplar principle works. In response to my questions he said he would be happy to explain the Doplar principle in court but not here now and that he would have to trace back to see if the bend was between our vehicles when the speed reading was taken.

The reply I received concerns me in many ways, firstly if the officer cannot explain the Doplar principle to me he doesn’t actually understand how the radar unit he operates works and as such he has no concept about how the readings taken by mobile devices can be incorrect. When I told him it was against operational guidlines for mobile radar devices to be used on bends, hills or multi lane roads he had no idea. He claimed that he operated by the law and the manufacturers guidlines for use of the device were not of any consequence.

I asked him a second time if he could explain the Doplar principle to me and he repeated his previous answer and avoided any discussion on the operation of the radar device. Before I departed he said to me that a little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing. I replied back that was definately correct in relation to the use of radar devices by Victorian Police. I added that he would be employed as an engineer instead of being a policeman if he had the aptitude to fully understand radar speed detectors.

It will be interesting to see if a summons to appear in court arrives, I am puzzled why a ticket wasn’t written on the spot. From this instance I can only comment that our mobile radar operators are not trained well enough to perform their duties and a high percentage of speeding tickets penalising motorists are not correct.

Police Patrols Replaced by Cameras

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

 http://www.policespeedcameras.info/  –  Originally Accessed on 29/4/2008

Why do you think speed cameras are so appealing to governments? Simple, speed cameras are cheaper to run than real police. Speed cameras don’t ask for pay rises or let off drivers with a warning – Real cops do! It’s based on a false economy to save money and raise revenue. What the community gets is a rise in road deaths and a bunch of young road hoons running the streets like a scene out of the movie “Mad Max” Don’t believe it? I live in Western Australia where the Police Traffic Branch was amalgamated with the local suburban police stations. So who looks after the streets now? Basically, its a free for all.